The Vatican taking the lead in IPv6 rollout?

Posted by Andree Toonk - October 26, 2009 - IPv6 - 6 Comments

IPv6 slowly seems to become more mainstream, we hear about IPv6 more and more and it seems that at least some Service providers and governments understand that there is a sense of urgency.  Regularly we see the statements of networks that are planning to roll out IPv6 and vendors that are promising to make their products IPv6 ready.

But talk is cheap and the question remains, how far are we actually with rolling out IPv6 deployment?  We tried to answer that question by looking at the Internet Routing tables.

IPv6 deployment ratio.
Each network in the global Internet has a unique Autonomous System (AS) number. An Autonomous System can be an Internet Service Provider (ISP), Enterprise network, content provider or any other sort of network. Each AS number announces one or more prefixes.  By using Geo IP libraries we are able to determine a country for each prefix. This in turn allows us to determine the unique number of networks (AS numbers) per country.   Doing this for both IPv4 as well as IPv6 will result in the IPv4/IPv6 deployment ratio.

Let’s look at for example at Canada. There are 816 Autonomous Systems that originate a prefix registered as in use in Canada.  If we look at the IPv6 routing tables we see that 50 Autonomous Systems announce a Canadian IPv6 prefix.  This results in an IPv6 deployment percentage of 6.1%. Meaning that 6.1% of the networks doing business in Canada are currently actively deploying IPv6.

Results
If we look at the global statistics, i.e. comparing all IPv4 Autonomous Systems with all IPv6 Autonomous Systems we see that the global IPv6/IPv4 deployment ratio is 5.26%. This is slightly higher than the 4.4% we measured in April 2009.

And the winner is
Jersey , a small country between England and France, is the only country scoring a 100% deployment ration.  IPv4 and IPv6 prefixes registered to Jersey are only announced by one provider, AS8681 Jersey Telecom; resulting in a 100% ratio.

Jersey is followed by Cuba (75%), Oman, Monaco, Holy See (Vatican City State) and Fiji all scoring 50%. If we look at the bigger countries, i.e countries with at least a 100 (IPv4) networks we see that Czech Republic (19%), New Zealand(18%), Japan (17%) and The Netherlands (17%) are leading.

Are we on the right track?
Ideally the IPv6 deployment percentage should be around ~100%. Globally today we score a 5% ratio. Although this is one percent higher than half a year ago it’s still very low. Never the less, it’s positive to see that some individual countries such as Tunisia and Uruguay score surprisingly high. And also Europe and parts of Asia seem to be on the right track.


Top 10%

Below an overview of all countries scoring higher than 10%.  A complete list with the results for for all countries can be found here: IPv6 deployment statistics October 2009


Country code Country Ipv6 deployment rate Ipv6 network / Ipv4 networks
JE Jersey 100% 1 / 1
CU Cuba 75% 3 / 4
OM Oman 50% 1 / 2
MC Monaco 50% 1 / 2
VA Holy See (Vatican City State) 50% 1 / 2
FJ Fiji 50% 1 / 2
TN Tunisia 33% 1 / 3
ML Mali 33% 1 / 3
UY Uruguay 31% 8 / 26
EE Estonia 26% 10 / 39
BT Bhutan 25% 1 / 4
SN Senegal 25% 1 / 4
IM Isle of Man 25% 1 / 4
LU Luxembourg 24% 10 / 42
LK Sri Lanka 23% 3 / 13
IS Iceland 21% 6 / 29
EU 20% 22 / 109
CZ Czech Republic 19% 34 / 176
NZ New Zealand 18% 35 / 194
JP Japan 17% 92 / 545
CI Cote D’Ivoire 17% 1 / 6
NL Netherlands 17% 85 / 511
MY Malaysia 17% 13 / 78
MU Mauritius 17% 1 / 6
VE Venezuela 16% 6 / 38
PT Portugal 15% 11 / 75
CR Costa Rica 15% 2 / 13
TW Taiwan, Province of China 15% 18 / 122
RW Rwanda 14% 1 / 7
NO Norway 14% 17 / 120
ZA South Africa 14% 13 / 92
VI Virgin Islands, U.s. 14% 1 / 7
HT Haiti 14% 1 / 7
IE Ireland 14% 18 / 130
MT Malta 13% 3 / 23
DE Germany 13% 149 / 1183
QA Qatar 13% 1 / 8
LI Liechtenstein 13% 2 / 15
VN Viet Nam 12% 6 / 50
AN Netherlands Antilles 12% 2 / 17
CH Switzerland 12% 51 / 437
EG Egypt 11% 5 / 46
SE Sweden 11% 38 / 344
TT Trinidad and Tobago 11% 1 / 9
SK Slovakia 10% 8 / 83

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